Call for papers on well-being of young children in Black immigrant and refugee families

The Migration Policy Institute’s (MPI) National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy is embarking on a timely new research project examining the well-being and development of young children in Black immigrant and refugee families in the first decade of life (birth to age 10). We welcome your support in circulating our Call for Papers to interested parties.

There are 1.3 million children in Black immigrant families in the United States, most with parents from Africa and the Caribbean. Children in these families account for 11 percent of all Black children in America and represent a rapidly growing segment of the US population (the African immigrant population alone rose by 63 percent from 2000 to 2008). Yet despite these demographics changes, children in Black immigrant families remain neglected by research studies.

To address this critical gap in understanding and to help build this nascent field, MPI is calling for papers from young and established scholars that address research and policy issues related to immigration and settlement patterns, education, language acquisition, health, parental and family resources, and other factors influencing child development and well-being.

We welcome papers documenting how these children are faring in the United States and papers offering international comparisons of how young children in Black immigrant and refugee families are faring in Canada, the United Kingdom, and/or other European countries. Core support for this project is provided by the Foundation for Child Development.

Full detail on the Call for Papers can be found at: www.migrationinformation.org/integration/callforpapers2010.pdf.

Details on the research project, as well as data on Black immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa can be found at the project’s home page: www.migrationinformation.org/integration/cbi_home.cfm.

One thought on “Call for papers on well-being of young children in Black immigrant and refugee families

  1. Clare

    Referring to the post “Call for papers on well-being of young children in Black immigrant and refugee families”, black immigrants have a really hard time to adjust themselves into their new lives, especially in language. In the chapter 9 of the book “Cultural Anthropology in a globalizing world”, Barbara Miller mentions that non-native speakers might have a hard time to speak other languages without their own accent. Even though most of the black people speak English, they still have a hard time to speak English without their accent in US. Moreover, black people would have their own style of speaking, just like the case of “African American English: prejudice and pride” (Miller 199). It talks about people want to get away the African American English (AAE), so black kids might have difficulty in school, where they need to speak in American Mainstream English (AME) (Miller 199). Many black kids may drop out from school because of that reason; therefore, the US government should pay more attention on this educational issue.

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